All posts by tgabrukiewicz

WDE Seeks Public Input on Wyoming Seal of Biliteracy

CHEYENNE – A Wyoming Seal of Biliteracy is being created for students proficient in two or more languages. An advisory committee of language educators will convene to recommend assessments and levels of proficiency on assessments that will enable students to earn a Seal of Biliteracy, including a seal with Advanced Distinction.

The Wyoming Department of Education is collecting public input to be shared with the Seal of Biliteracy Advisory Committee, which will develop recommendations that will be forwarded to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

To provide input, complete the Seal of Biliteracy Public Input Survey by 11:59 p.m. on June 2, 2022. The Seal of Biliteracy was created by Senate Enrolled Act 47 of the 2022 Wyoming Legislature.

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Media Contact:
Linda Finnerty, Communications Director
307-777-2053
linda.finnerty@wyo.gov

Vision & Focus

Dear Superintendents,

I was hoping to be able to say this round that “Spring has Sprung!” But given the recent weather relapses, apparently not. Hopefully by the time you get this, things will have changed. In the meantime, we’ll hold off on any premature proclamations.

Nonetheless, we hope these final days of school prove smooth and productive as you wind things down in your districts, and do let us know how we can better support and serve you here at the WDE. Thank you for all you do.


Vision & Focus

In terms of the prospects of casting the first glimpses of a vision for our Wyoming schools, it will of necessity be rooted in identity (the character of the Wyoming people), courage (the tenacity of our school leadership), clarity (regarding the purpose and priority of education) and commitment (to being the very best).

To reiterate, the contention that Wyoming is poised to lead the nation in education does not mean that it will, it simply means that it can. Identity, courage and clarity only set the stage, they do not determine the outcome. Like anything else in life, commitment will ultimately determine that. Vision gives birth to commitment, and commitment sustains focus. We need both, vision and focus. To be continued …


The Primary Priority   

On the Teacher Apprenticeship initiative, we met with Governor Mark Gordon on May 18 to present key details and aspects of the draft framework.  I am pleased to report that he was excited about what he heard, and very affirming about the prospects of what this initiative can mean for our schools across the state.

We’ll continue to keep you posted about next steps as progress happens. The desire at this point (knock on wood!) is to pilot Phase One this fall in three school districts (small, medium and large). We welcome any related thoughts or questions; reach out to linda.finnerty@wyo.gov.


In The Spotlight

The WDE Deaf and Hard of Hearing Outreach team, consisting of Billie Wortham and Christy Fritz, uses on-site visits and data to identify areas of need in educational services for students with hearing loss across the state, from birth through grade 12. To address these needs, the team provides a high level of personalized technical assistance, training, coaching, and resources. This team recognizes a significant need in early intervention services to support language and early literacy skills.

Addressing these needs has led to the creation of a ground breaking service model in Wyoming called the Wyoming Early Intervention Initiative Plus Program (WEII). WEII Plus will officially be rolled out on July 1, 2022 During the nearly three years development, strong partnerships between the WDE, Wyoming Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, Early Intervention and Education Programs, Wyoming Families for Hands & Voices, Child Development Services and the Marion Downs Center.

Billie and Christy, thank you for all you do!


On the Road, In The Field

This week’s travels took me to two wonderful districts, Sheridan #2 and Sheridan #3, headed up by Superintendent Scott Stults and Superintendent Boyd Brown respectively.  Both of these seasoned leaders have learned a lot in all their years of service and have much to share. For my part, I gained a wealth of knowledge and perspective interacting with them and picking their brains, and came away (again) inspired by and grateful for the interactions.

It was very apparent how blessed both districts are, having some very special teachers and staff. Moreover, the Professional Learning Communities philosophy that both districts embrace is a thing of beauty when done right, and bears incredible fruit on so many levels. While many schools across the nation have become some of the most toxic places on earth for a kid to have to endure, these two districts live out the dynamics of what a healthy (not perfect) community in the school setting looks like. Two more examples of why Wyoming schools can lead the nation.


Mark Your Calendars

The Wyoming State Board of Education (SBE) has launched a second round of public input sessions around the Profile of a Graduate initiative. The public can provide input on a draft profile created utilizing statewide input received during the first round of listening sessions. The Phase II virtual vetting sessions will take place on the following dates:

  • From 4-5 p.m. on May 23; register here.
  • From noon-1 p.m. on May 26; register here.
  • From 8-9 a.m. on June 1; register here.
  • From 6-7 p.m. on June 7; register here.

Wyoming-based organizations may schedule a virtual session by contacting Diana Clapp, State Board of Education Coordinator, at diana.clapp@wyo.gov. The public is also encouraged to provide feedback through an online survey, which can be found here.


Monday memos:

Sincerely,

BSchroederSig

2022 Wyoming Summer Food Service Program to Begin Soon

CHEYENNE – The Wyoming Summer Food Service program for kids offered through the Wyoming Department of Education kicks off soon. Every summer the program delivers thousands of meals to Wyoming children and teens.

“Classes will be ending soon, and Wyoming children and teens do not have to go hungry because their school is out of session,” said Amanda Anderson, Nutrition Program Consultant with the Wyoming Department of Education. “We are loaded with summer food program sites from border to border. Finding a program near you is just a few clicks away.”

The Wyoming Department of Education’s (WDE) website includes a link to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) map where Wyoming families can easily identify the food service site, or sites, nearest to them. Information is available here, call 211 or contact Amanda Andersen at (307) 777-7168 or amanda.anderson@wyo.gov.

The Summer Food Service Program is a federally funded, state-administered program. The program reimburses providers who serve free, healthy meals to children and teens during the summer months when school is not in session. In addition to serving food, summer food sites often include activities for students to do during the summer including crafts and games.

About the Wyoming Summer Food Service Program

The USDA’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), also known as the Summer Meals Program, provides kids and teens free meals when school is out. There are several ways that local organizations can be a part of the Summer Meals Program. In Wyoming the program is offered through the WDE.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and USDA civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits.  Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.  Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: How to File a Complaint, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

  1. mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
  2. fax: (202) 690-7442; or
  3. email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

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Media Contact:
Linda Finnerty, Communications Director
307-777-2053
linda.finnerty@wyo.gov

Wyoming’s 2022 U.S. Presidential Scholars

Greetings District Superintendents,

In this week’s update, in addition to another layer of vision casting and the latest on the Teacher Apprenticeship initiative, we proudly recognize Wyoming’s two U.S. Presidential Scholars, and eagerly share our most recent “on the road” excursion. We then conclude with the details of our Week of Academic Vision for Excellence (WAVE) Conference and some important memos from our department chiefs.


Vision & Focus

Besides being rooted in a solid identity, if a national leadership role is in the cards for us, it will require tenacity, integrity, and a good measure of vision, determination and perseverance – some of the core ingredients of courage. This week, some mild musings on this crucial leadership trait.

Among all the decisions, big and small, we as leaders face every day – sometimes several times a day – we must decide whether to give in to our fears (we all have them) or push through and overcome them. Leadership is an enterprise that only functions well when it yields to courage; therefore, fear-based leadership is not leadership.

If courage is about doing the right thing – the thing that needs to be done no matter the consequences, personally or professionally – then healthy leadership is synonymous with courage. So if Wyoming schools are poised to take the lead, it will be in large part because Wyoming schools have a courageous quality to them. With few exceptions, this quality trickles down from its leaders. Everything does rise or fall on leadership, but leadership rises or falls on courage.


The Primary Priority   

Recently, several of us here at the WDE participated in a webinar hosted by former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Tennessee Commissioner Penny Schwinn called “Grow Your Own: Tennessee’s Teacher Apprenticeship, A National Model.” In response to the teacher shortage crisis that the Volunteer State had been experiencing for the last several years, leadership there developed an innovative program that became wildly successful in solving this serious problem, and have been equally excited about sharing it with the rest of the nation.

This special digital presentation was not only informative and instructive, but tremendously inspiring, as we continue to work toward launching our own Wyoming version of a Teacher Apprenticeship initiative. While our work group puts on the finishing touches, the anticipation builds in preparation for our presentation to Governor Mark Gordon on May 18. We’ll keep you posted as things move ahead on this front.


In the Spotlight

Congratulations go out to Isabelle Radakovich from Cody High School and Keegan Allen Miller from Laramie High School – Wyoming’s 2022 U.S. Presidential Scholars! U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona announced the 58th class of U.S. Presidential Scholars, recognizing 161 high school seniors for their accomplishments in academics, the arts, and career and technical education fields.

The White House Commission on Presidential Scholars selects scholars annually based on their academic success, artistic and technical excellence, essays, school evaluations and transcripts, as well as a demonstrated commitment to community service and leadership.

“Our 2022 Presidential Scholars represent the best of America, and remind us that when empowered by education, there are no limits to what our young people can achieve,” Cardona said.


On the Road, In The Field

Deputy Superintendent Chad Auer and I had the pleasure of touring the now legendary WyoTech, a true Wyoming treasure. Homegrown in Laramie, the school has survived 60 years of ups and downs, including corporate purchases, expansions, closures and bankruptcy. In the summer of 2018, through the last-ditch efforts of Governor Matt Mead, several legislators and Jim Mathis (a former student, teacher and executive across the years), the doors remained open with only 12 students. The student count had gone as high as several thousand at times in the past.

Fast forward to 2022, thanks to the visionary and tireless leadership of Mr. Mathis and his team, every square foot of the school’s many buildings are now bustling with the sounds of students and staff toiling away on vehicles and equipment of every kind. In addition, a plan for significant expansion is nearing implementation. What a terrific place to have right in the backyard of our high school students as they consider college, military and career ready options going forward.

You can learn more about WyoTech here.


Mark Your Calendars

The WDE’s Special Education Programs Division announces the return of the annual in-person Week of Academic Vision for Excellence (WAVE) Conference to be held at the Central Wyoming College in Riverton from July 26-28. The WDE will offer this conference at no cost for 2022. This conference is relevant for educators, parents, and other Wyoming stakeholders. State and national presenters will cover topics such as trauma response, behavior/discipline, and Special Education law.

Join department staff for a meet-and-greet reception on July 26 at the Riverton Country Club. Due to limited space, pre-registration for this event is required by July 5. A ticket will be provided for admittance when you pick up your name tag at the conference registration table.

Registration will close on July 5, 2022.

  • Register for the conference here.
  • 2022 WAVE Conference schedules, presenter session descriptions, presenter bios, and venue information can be found here.

For more information, contact Deana Smith at 307-777-5326 or deana.smith@wyo.gov or Jennifer Duncan at 307-777-3530 or jennifer.duncan@wyo.gov.


Monday memos:

Sincerely,

BSchroederSig

Teacher Job Satisfaction

Dear Superintendents,

Governor Mark Gordon proclaimed May 1-7 as Teacher Appreciation Week, and we were honored here in Cheyenne by the presence of two of our illustrious Wyoming teachers who attended the governor’s proclamation signing at the Capitol. We thanked them for their long-term diligent commitment and we again thank you for the same. Stay encouraged and take care of yourselves – our students and parents need you to stay in the game for the long haul.


Vision & Focus

Leading the nation in education is a multi-splendored thing to be sure, but one of the key guideposts will be identity – knowing who we are and who we are not. Security breeds leadership and leadership breeds security. Wyoming is poised to lead the nation in education because it knows who it is and who it is not.

The same goes for our schools. Over time, like our local communities, our schools develop an identity based on a culture. If healthy (or becoming healthier), it will serve as an anchor for our young people. If it endures, it can serve as an example for our entire nation. That’s the vision.


The Primary Priority   

According to the Merrimack College Teacher Survey, teacher job satisfaction has hit an all-time low. Representing more than 1,300 teachers, this representative poll paints a picture of a disillusioned, exhausted workforce.

It is unclear to what extent this “heaviness” is affecting Wyoming teachers, but we know the teacher shortage crisis is real. Therefore, the primary priority for the WDE is the Wyoming Teacher Apprenticeship Initiative based in part on the highly-successful Tennessee model.

Our newly-formed work group (a robust cross-section of all the key stakeholders) had another very productive meeting recently. The excitement builds as we prepare for our meeting with Governor Gordon on May 18, when we present the draft apprenticeship framework. We will keep you posted as things transpire on this front every step of the way.


In the Spotlight

If you recall back in the fall of 2020, the WDE announced that it had been awarded the Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy grant by the United States Department of Education. Year one funding for Wyoming was $8.6 million. With continued eligibility over the following five years, the total could reach $43.3 million. The grant is being used to create a comprehensive state literacy program to advance literacy skills — including pre-literacy skills, reading, and writing — for students from birth through grade 12, including limited-English-proficient students and students with disabilities. As of May 2022, the full amount has been granted through 2025 to the 24 school districts that have applied.


On the Road, In The Field

The past couple weeks have brought several more inspiring school district visits. The first one took us up to beautiful Sundance at Crook County #1, hosted by Superintendent Mark Broderson, while the second one was just around the corner at home here in Cheyenne at Laramie County #1 with Dr. Margaret Crespo.

A third trip ventured up to Campbell County #1 with Deputy Superintendent Kirby Eisenhauer, complemented the same day with a stop at the delightful Youth Emergency Services House in Gillette with Clark Fairbanks and some of his dedicated colleagues. Thursday took us to Natrona County District #1 with Superintendent Mike Jennings and his Associate Superintendent Walt Wilcox, and Friday capped it all off at Johnson County School District #1 with a visit to Superintendent Charles Auzqui and his Buffalo schools.

I wish time and space allowed for some highlights from these visits, but suffice it to say, each one has again yielded an enriched perspective on all the good things going on in our schools as well as an appreciation for how hard our district and school leaders are working to get the job done. While much going on across our nation in education is very concerning, Wyoming schools give me hope.


Mark Your Calendars

The 2022 Summer Technical Assistance Retreat (STAR) Conference will be held virtually from June 21-23, and June 28-29, 2022. The STAR Conference will focus on Grants Management System, Homeless Education, Consolidated Federal Grants, and more. From June 21-23, the sessions will focus on Federal Programs management, and from June 28-29 the annual McKinney-Vento Homeless Education post-conference will be offered.

Registration is open for both conferences. The cost for the STAR Conference is $45. There is no registration fee for the McKinney-Vento post-conference, but registration is required. For detailed information about the conference, keynote speakers, and registration, follow these links:

• Registration

• Session Schedule


Monday Memos

Sincerely,

BSchroederSig

Wyoming Charter School Application Now Available

CHEYENNE – The Wyoming legislature amended the Charter School statutes to allow for an alternative path for approval of charter schools (W.S. 21-3-301 through W.S. 21-3-314). This change allows for charter schools to apply to either the local district or the State Loan and Investment Board (SLIB) and will take effect July 1, 2022.

The Wyoming Department of Education (WDE) revised the Chapter 32 Charter School Rules to reflect these changes. Public comment was open and received between February 18 and April 18. Additionally, a public hearing was held on April 14, 2022. Currently the rules are awaiting approval from Governor Mark Gordon’s Office.

Additionally, the WDE has revised the charter school application. For charter school applications submitted in 2022, the applications may be submitted between July 15 and August 15 or 30 days after these rules become effective, whichever is later. A copy of the application can be found here.

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Media Contact:
Linda Finnerty, Communications Director
307-777-2053
linda.finnerty@wyo.gov

A Vision for Wyoming Schools

Greetings,

Hope this finds you all well! As you continue to guide our Wyoming schools, be sure to let us know how we can help or get out the way, whichever is needed. The WDE stands ready to serve, and the hard-working staff here will leave no stone unturned in helping you make our schools the best possible and our students the highest-achieving possible.

In this edition of the Update, we will continue unpacking (layer by layer) a vision for Wyoming Schools, reporting on our most pressing initiative, spotlighting some of the great work and great people here at the WDE, and sharing briefly about some of the latest district visits. It will also include our usual calendar notation as well as the regular chief memos.


Vision & Focus

Wyoming is poised to lead the nation in education. As stated before, that doesn’t mean it will, it just means it could. There is something deep within the DNA and character of Wyoming people that sets the stage for a model of education that could be the envy of our entire country.

An example of this happened during the COVID-19 pandemic: why did the Cowboy State lead the nation in the most in-person class time of any state in the Union? When outside forces put on the pressure to shut down our schools, the people of Wyoming put on the pressure to keep them open.

So Wyoming schools begin to take the lead when they doggedly resist the cultural pressure to go in the same direction that thousands of other schools in the country are going. If this is Wyoming’s destiny, it will become one of Wyoming’s greatest legacies. Let’s make it happen!


The Primary Priority   

The Teacher Apprenticeship Initiative continues to make progress. The WDE, PTSB and other Work Group members have begun drafting a framework to present to the Governor and an Advisory Group in mid-May. Both the Work Group and the Advisory Group represent the key stakeholders in our state that will be needed to bring this initiative forward.


In the Spotlight

What an honor it was to meet this week with Major General Gregory Porter and some of his staff to hear about the good things the Wyoming Military Department (WYMD) is doing in our state, especially as it relates to our schools and the WDE. Besides the important contribution of the Wyoming Cowboy Challenge Academy with at-risk students, the WYMD will launch its second year of the Educator Leadership Rendezvous (ELR) this summer, on August 3-5.

During this three-day event, the WYMD will host around 40 Wyoming educators, counselors and principals at Camp Guernsey. The camp will focus on building partnerships with the WDE through various activities and presentations conducted by WYMD personnel.

Participants not only develop a stronger sense of connectedness and a deeper appreciation for each other’s respective roles, but professional educators will come away with a more acute awareness of some of the opportunities that the WYMD provides to students. They will also come to better recognize how the WYMD further supports service members while in college and during their careers, all the while preserving military readiness.

With the steep decline in military enlistments not only in our state but across the country, we want to do everything we can to promote patriotism in our schools and increase interest in the high honor of serving one’s country through military service. This is one very significant way to do that.


Mark Your Calendars

The 2022 Wyoming Innovations in Learning Conference seeks engaging virtual session proposals from educators in kindergarten through postsecondary education that will be delivered in an online format. Proposals are open now through May 13, 2022. Register here.


Monday Memos

Sincerely,

BSchroederSig

Leading the Nation

Dear Superintendents,

Spring has sprung (we hope), and as you lead your schools to the finish line, I hope the change of season recharges your batteries and renews your resolve. At the same time, Spring is a great reminder of the need to get outside and smell the flowers! The work-life balance is a challenge for all of us, and at times seemingly impossible to achieve – but strive for it we must or burn out we will. Take care of yourselves, protect that all-important family time and enjoy the great outdoors of Wyoming!


Vision & Focus

Continuing our thoughts from last week, how is it conceivable that the smallest state in the Union in population could lead that Union in education? Or in the words of one who shares this vision, UW Ellbogen Dean, Dr. Scott Thomas: “Second to none by 2030!”

Are we both dreaming? Maybe, but sometimes it takes an outsider (or two) to share a fresh take on just how unique Wyoming is and how very special the people of Wyoming remain. Our country is losing itself, yet Wyoming as a whole, has still not drunk the Kool-Aid. So for starters, we can lead the nation by not following the direction that much of it is going, and helping our kids resist the cultural abyss that is clawing at them. That will be the essential piece if we are to emerge as leaders on the education front. More next time.


The Primary Priority   

Things are moving at a brisk pace with the teacher apprenticeship initiative. A workgroup has been formed that represents key stakeholders and will have its first meeting next week.

WDE and PTSB team members had a very productive meeting this week with key staff from the Tennessee Department of Education. Working closely with the US Department of Labor, these trailblazers were the first state in the country to sponsor Teacher Occupation Apprenticeship programs. Registered apprenticeship programs will allow for high-quality, industry-driven, work-based learning pathways that provide individuals with hands-on work experience while earning a wage that increases during the progression of the program.

Tennessee has paved the way for other states and are graciously sharing the results of multiple years of work in the form of a Playbook and other key materials and supports. Although the materials will not be available until early May, our team was able to gather significant information that not only confirmed various aspects of our own evolving framework, but will also allow us to keep things moving forward. While we do not intend to simply mirror what Tennessee has done, Wyoming will use these valuable resources to accelerate the process here at home.


In the Spotlight

We would be remiss if we did not “give honor to whom honor is due.”  Our own Dustin Brown and Laura Budd are doing some cutting-edge work with Wyoming Project Aware, so they will be our first WDE staffers to be put in this new Spotlight segment.

Dustin and Laura oversee the WDE efforts to provide behavioral health and substance abuse services within ten of our Wyoming school districts.  As they design theoretical models to maximize student class attendance, they also provide important support to other state agencies working on healthcare.

No surprise then that they are receiving growing recognition for their work:

  • Their Wyoming Project AWARE Referral Pathway and Wyoming NOMS data collection processes are nationally recognized as a Best Practice.
  • Their Wyoming Tier 3 Clinical Intervention Services has been deemed “innovative” by the National Leadership Team.
  • Their Telehealth concept design is considered revolutionary by the CDC.
  • They have been asked to provide presentations to the national or cohort audiences four times in the last year and twice this year currently

Congratulations, Dustin and Laura, you are in the spotlight.


Mark Your Calendars

The Fifth Annual Wyoming English as a Second Language and Dual Language Immersion Conference is April 29-30 in Gillette. The conference will offer a stimulating environment to share participants’ work, network, and learn from one another. Register here for free. View the conference schedule for more information.


Monday Memos

Sincerely,

BSchroederSig

Weekly Update, a New Focus

Greetings District Superintendents,

I wish to start by saying thank you again for your dedication to making each of your districts the best they can possibly be. It can be lost on most people, I know, the long hours you put in and how difficult your job is. Hang in there, and take care of yourself. Everything rises and falls on leadership – and you are the leaders of our educational communities that are preparing the future of America. Stay encouraged, you are doing great work.

This week, we are introducing a new format for this weekly communique. The look, as well as some new components will reflect a fresh start and new direction here at the WDE. As always, your feedback will be coveted and appreciated. I hope it will be helpful.


Vision & Focus

Future entries in this space will unveil – layer by layer, week by week – a vision for our Wyoming schools that will (hopefully) not only serve to sharpen our collective focus, but also help to reinforce a model of education that is consistent with the DNA and character of the good people of Wyoming.

In this edition, we’ll begin by restating an audacious possibility that has been referenced a couple times in other venues over the past two months: Wyoming is poised to lead the nation in education. That doesn’t mean it will, it just means it could – and if it could, it should. Is this a hollow Pollyannaish platitude, or a big-picture vision rooted in reality?  Hold that thought … to be continued.


The Primary Priority   

This new section will keep our singular most urgent statewide educational challenge front-and-center, until the problem is solved. In the last two years, that would have been the COVID-19 pandemic; presently, it is the crisis of the nationwide teacher shortage.

Learning everything we can about the best recruitment and retention strategies from those “in the trenches” (here at home), as well as from the innovative work going on in other states, we will seek to aggressively pursue and develop multiple break-the-mold pathways to the teaching profession. This could come via some very successful customized teacher-apprenticeship models, and/or some incredibly fruitful “grow-your-own” teacher residency programs. If Tennessee can go from 1,000-1,200 teacher vacancies per year to a waiting list of hundreds, so can we.

Please do not hesitate to send us your thoughts and ideas as we make this our primary priority.  Just as our schools function better when they listen closely and carefully to the parents as the owners of the schools, so we here at the WDE will function better as we listen closely and carefully to Wyoming’s professional educators. You can send that feedback directly to askthesuperintendent@wyo.gov.  More next week.


On the Road, In The Field

On April 8, I was given the opportunity to speak to more than 1,500 young people at the annual FFA Convention in Cheyenne. Besides the incredible energy level in that place (they were having so much fun), I was immediately struck by how gracious and respectful these FFA teenagers were. Their kindness and natural humility was for me a refreshing flashback to another more innocent time in this country, and reinforced again the emerging conviction that Wyoming – in many ways – is still what all of America used to be.

As I told the group that night, I have always been – and will always be – a big fan of the FFA, not only because there are some things you can’t learn in a classroom, but also because, in a society addicted to change for change’s sake, there are still some things, thankfully, that never change – FFA is one enduring example.


Mark Your Calendars

The Quantum Science Summer School at Casper College is set for July 10-23, 2022. The school is under the direction of Dr. Marlan Scully, a Casper native and member of the National Academy of Science. The camp will be a high-level summer quantum science program in conjunction with Scully’s colleagues at the National Academy of Science and his lab at Texas A&M University. There is no charge to participate, and dorm housing and food will be provided. Get all the details here.


Monday Memos

 

Sincerely,

BSchroederSig

WDE Seeks Waiver for Extension of Community Eligibility Provision Deadlines

CHEYENNE – The Wyoming Department of Education Child Nutrition Programs (CNP) has submitted a waiver request to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (USDA FNS) to extend the current Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) deadlines. The extension of the CEP deadlines is in response to the recovery of the pandemic to allow school districts time to collect the necessary data to participate in CEP for SY 2022–23.

The request to extend the CEP deadlines is expected to assist school districts in making the decision to participate in CEP for the next four years. Due to previous USDA waivers school districts have not collected the data to determine the election of CEP. The waiver will provide sufficient time for districts to collect the necessary data to make the CEP determination.

If the waiver is approved, the Wyoming Department of Education CNP will provide detailed information and instructions for National School Lunch (NSLP) and School Breakfast (NSBP) sponsors on the new timelines of the waiver.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

– END –

Media Contact:
Linda Finnerty, Communications Director
307-777-2053
linda.finnerty@wyo.gov